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20130107
20130115
STATION
CSPAN 23
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English 23
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
? caller: i would recommend that, but in a targeted way. as you probably know, the fbi has a national fingerprinting database that could exist for people with mental illnesses. the real issue is the accountability for those the purchase weapons. not only the accountability of the owner, but those who may steal them. bob host: this commentary comes from examiner -- steal them. host: this commentary comes from examiner.com. host: so, we are getting your thoughts this morning. what are the other articles this morning in the arts section of "the new york times"? this is the front page. the picture next to this show of the golden globe winners from last night. the issue of extreme violence on screens has become a thicket that programmers cannot avoid. "i do not think that there is anyone on this planet whose life has not been changed or affected by the recent course of events. nothing that is on the air is inappropriate. the network justifies the level of carnage by making sure the bad guys are brought to justice. there's a shot -- "criminal lines" is an adult show -- criminal minds" is an
's a message for you. the f.b.i. has seized your office. and i called george frampleton. i don't know. he was the one i could reach. and i got on a 6:00 a.m. flight the next morning to come back to participate in discussions of what the office should do because what had hampled was he fired archie. he did not fire us. so there was a lot of discussion of do we quit in protest or do we say, ok, archie's gone but we're still here. we need to do our job. and we're going to stay. he's going to have to make a second big public relations error by firing us. >> what did he do? >> well, what happened is that they actually closed the office for nano second and then reopened it and robert bork who then was solicitor general and acting attorney general at that point because everybody above him had either been fired or had resigned. he became the head of this -- of the special prosecutor's office. i interviewed him for the library and he said look -- he said i, robert was nervous because he said, i could be charged with obstruction of justice if i closed it down. he kept it alive and they hired leon w
the $14 billion that funds the fbi, the dea, the secret service, the atf, and the u.s. marshals service. this is an historic reversal. in 1986 when this all began, ins comprised less than 25% of the spending of the other underlined enforcement agencies. if you look at page 22 of your engineering manual, you will see a graph that clearly shows this flip and what historic change has taken place over this period of time. border enforcement is by far the largest share of spending. it is the largest spending for everything in the immigration system, all of the other immigration functions. among other things, it has made possible the doubling of the border patrol in the last 8 years from 10,819 to 21,370. even though its growth is enormous, the growth of i.c.e. is also substantial. that growth has been 87% since 2005 from a number of $3.10 billion until $5.10 billion. those are the big framing points that i hope paint the picture of what it is we are doing in this report. that we go to the pillars i will say some things about and turn it to my colleagues. the first of the pillars that we disc
in the story is hilarious. >> head of the fbi at the time. >> who is going to take a personal interest in whether there is a homosexual ring, a gay ring, at the center of the nixon administration. he was the deputy assistant to the president, a good-looking california guy. >> here we are -- i can remember going home, you are scared to death. this is like a time bomb. this gets in the press and anderson gets going -- it is a disaster for all of us. and it is not true. the next day, each of us individually go into the cab that and sit across, right across -- we are sworn in. and then each of us is questioned by j. edgar hoover. he asks all of the questions -- the transcript of this was provided to jack anderson. that is how it was stopped. >> and hoover was planning to give this to anderson? >> no. anderson was going to go with the story -- jack anderson, the columnist. he was the one who is going to put the photographer down there and -- i have always thought, if i ever see brit hume i will ask him, because he was working for anderson at the time. anderson is getting ready to go for the
way it would actually be great if we have f.b.i. agents and in santa clara breaking down the doors of gravely ill pot smokers that will tell people more than the cato institute. one last point about this and i'll end. you see the force of the anti-commandeering rule and something that justin mentioned and that is the affordable care act. this seems far removed but it isn't. if you look at the affordable care act, the same reason, how far does tax power go? how far does commerce power go? but the mandate that was at issue in that case in the nfib case, that's not the engine that drives the affordable care act. the engine that drives that act is the exchanges, the state exchangeses which weren't even an issue in that case but will be, i hope. here's the way this works. initially the administration and congress wanted to commandeer states to establish changes. they then realize that oops, we can't do that because there's the anti-commandeering rule and that will be unconstitutional. and insthread be a preemption regime. either you sblish an exchange under our orders and in accordance
of leaped over the counter and said, there is a message for you. the fbi has seized your office. i called george rampant -- heat -- frampton, he was the one i could reach. i got on a light the next morning to participate in discussions of what the office should do. what happened is he fired archie -- he did not fire us. there was a lot of discussion of, do we quit in protest or do we say, ok, archie is gone but we are still here. we need to do my job and we need to stay. he will have to make a second big public-relations error by firing us. >> what did he do? >> what happened is that they closed the office for a nanosecond and then they reopen debt and robert bork, who was then solicitor general and acting attorney general because everybody about him had been fired or had resigned, he became the head of this, of this special prosecutor's office. i interviewed him -- he said, i was nervous because i could be charged with obstruction of justice. he kept it alive and they hired someone else, a texas democrat -- nixon hired him to replace archibald cox. in the end he would be even tougher on
of national intelligence, and the national security elements of the fbi were merged into the national security branch. these efforts were born of the need to institutionalize and facilitate information sharing, to bridge a gap that existed between intelligence and law- enforcement capabilities. on the heels of this change, it became evident that another service was in pretty high demand. it is what the commission called a thoughtful, innovative, and constructive legal guidance. following recommendations from the commission and others, the national security division was created in the department of justice to ensure unity of purpose among intelligence lawyers and the community on one hand with law-enforcement and prosecutors on the other. the division functions really reflect a removal of legal, structural, and cultural barriers. they have brought the department's national security elements under one roof and into closer alignment with those of the fbi and the rest of the national security community. as these lawyers work as terrorism and espionage prosecutors, they work as intelligence lawyers
briefing along with the attorney-general and the director of the fbi. just like the analysts and special agents who are working these issues, we aim to stay on top of the threat picture and to help devise tactics and strategies and tools for getting ahead of it. today its standard -- it is standard procedure for agents conducting counterterrorism investigations to consult throughout the process with attorneys and prosecutors in the national security division. that is to ensure that all potential avenues for destruction of a threat, intelligence gathering, investigation and prosecution are all preserved. if you asked me to break down how much intelligence versus how much law enforcement work we do, i would be hard pressed to give you an answer. we are almost always pursuing multiple tracks at the same time. we no longer have to across organizational lines to bring tools and talent to bear against a particular threat or problem. for instance, our office lawyers in the office of intelligence work day in and day out with the intelligence community to secure authorities under the surveillance
interested in what we were doing, and so the assistant director of the fbi for counter-terrorism came to west point and said the fbi could benefit from this kind of education as well. and so they asked west point to go and expand our education for cadets to what we now call practitioner education. we send people from west point and combating and they teach each new about a boc of instruction on terrorism to reinforce the things that are taught at the f.b.i. academy. we also send them out around the nation to be able to work with joint terrorism task forces, which is not just f.b.i. people, but also law enforcement and others to educate them on the terrorist threat and the changes. and then creating a virtual network because of the connections of everybody on the internet so that when pracktigsners that are out there in police departments or the f.b.i. are studying a particular case or aspect of terrorism they can reach back into the literature and research at west point and get a little bit more expertise and the history and the background and the theory that they're able to do. >> what kind
interested in what we were doing, and so the assistant director of the fbi for counter- terrorism came to west point and said the fbi could benefit from this kind of education as well. and so they asked west point to go and expand our education for cadets to what we now call practitioner education. we send people from west point and combating terrorism center down to quantico, virginia, to the fbi academy, and they teach each new agent and new analyst instruction on terrorism to reinforce the kinds of things that are taught at the fbi academy. to come here and be informed about what we are doing to counter terrorism and where that is going. i'll tell you a little bit about that. i do want to state for all of you and especially for c-span these are my personal academic opinions and not the position of the united states government so they have that disclaimer out there. although, as you'll hear as i'm talking about it, i think it should be the position of the united states government. >> we know of osama bin lot and hiding and others hiding in various areas and in other places until the
. through thene district attorney about this. we have the solutions. the fbi is covering of the use of these drugs. it tells you all about these drugs. he wrote the book those in the fact that they are doing this. thank you. here are some handouts for you. >> could we please have mike dunlap? i was born here. my first gun i took to school for show and tell. i worked on a dairy ranch. every kid learned how to deal with a fire arm. they knew which is not to point with anything you did not want to destroy. i would like to ask a couple of things. we want to get the violence out of the use of guns. i currently live in lake county. last year we started a women's program. we have had a bunch coming out that have never touched a gun before. it has been extraordinary to watch the change and these women. are we listening to me are watching him? ok. you put it on the table that everything is on the table. i want to hold due to that. i do not want this to be everything is on the table the way that republicans were. do not define what the middle is an start from there. let's talk about the whole
of auditors and criminal investigators. more than the fbi. it's not just our size, mandate, or unique authority that is important. it is how we and how i view our mission and how our agency sees that mission. when i joined sigar, i made it clear on the first day that you should view this as a mission and not as a job. if you see this as a job, as a place to retire in place, you should leave, because i only wanted people with fire in the belly, because we have a limited amount of time to do good in the construction in afghanistan. i have used that fire in the belly speech so much that my chief of staff has coined a new term called "fitb." it has worked. i am proud of my 200 agents, auditors, and investigators, because they all have that fire in the belly. they can work elsewhere. some of them are working in the worst conditions. they're working in conditions as bad as our military is in afghanistan. many of them are housed in the same facilities. they take the mission because they believe in it. that is the difference with sigar. that's why i think we can make a difference. i also told
interviewed. there were clues in the fbi. the fbi did not talk to the cia. we came up with a model that fixed the pentagon. the pentagon used to have the services staffing and fighting separate wars. they would equip themselves separately. we decided to do what the military did. a joint command was created. he can come from any military service. they now trained and equipped to gather. -- togetherthe dni is the joint commander across 16 intel agencies. he leverage is their strength to produce intel products. that is the backbone of how we get intelligence to policy makers and that has dramatically improved. on the fusion centers, that is a different thing. those are local centers that have gone up to serve local law enforcement. they pull together national intelligence streams that they get from the homeland security department or the fbi with streams of local intelligence and a share it. the homelands department has tried to insist on privacy in these agencies and provide some financial support. this is a work in progress. some of them worked very well. one in los angeles works very well. ot
also created the department of home and security, and the national security elements of the fbi were merged into its national security branch. these efforts were born of the need to institutionalize and facilitate information sharing and to bridge a gap that existed between our intelligence and law-enforcement capabilities. on the heels of all of this change, it also became evident that and other service was in high demand, it is what the wmd commission called "thoughtful and constructive legal guidance." following recommendations from that commission and others, the national security division was created within the department of justice to make sure we have a unity of purpose among the intelligence community and law enforcement and prosecutors. functions division's reflect the removal of legal and cultural barriers. nsd has brought them under one roof and is in closer alignment with those of the fbi and the rest of the national security community. nsd's lawyers worked as terrorism prosecutors alongside their colleagues in the u.s. attorney offices around the country and they work as
the $14.4 billion that funds the f.b.i., the d.e.a., the secret service, the a.t.f. and the u.s. marshal service. this is a historic reversal, because in 1986 when this all began, i.n.s. comprised 28% of the spending of all of the other law enforcement agencies. and if you look at page 22 of your engineering manual, you will see a graph that very clearly shows this and what a historic change has taken place over this period of time. border enforcement by far is the largest share of this spending. it's the largest spending for everything in the immigration system, all of the other immigration functions, and among other things it's made possible the doubling of the border patrol in just the last eight years from $10,819 to where it stands today which is in the neighborhood of 21,370. but even though c.v.p. and its growth is enormous, the growth of i.c.e. is also very substantial. that growth has been 87% since 2005, from a number of $3.1 billion to today about $5.9 billion. so those are the big framing points that i hope paints a picture of what it is that we're doing in this report. let m
enforcement than we do for the fbi, the dea, the atf, and other federal law enforcement agencies, at some point we have to acknowledge -- and we have been courted more people than any time before -- we have to acknowledge that the time is now for a balanced approach. >> can the coalition of blacks, latinos, and other communities sustain the obama campaign? are we looking at a true shift in the rhetorical landscape? >> i will point that for a second. i do not want to talk about campaigns. i will just say this quickly. i think what we saw was a seminal shift in the electorate and if the republicans do not go to the center and continue to be dominated by the far right, you will see them lose more and more market share. you did not mention young people. the questioner did not. young people, blacks, latinos, asians, women. it does not look good for them. i prefer focusing on the immigration issue. >> what role do the congressional caucuses of color, such as the congressional -- the hispanic caucus, the asian- american, caucus, and the black caucus play in reform? >> i think they need to play a
cleared for transfer, that the cia and department of justice and the fbi have looked at and concluded we are not to prosecute them, we do not have evidence, and we do not believe they present a significant risk to us, and we do not want to keep them -- they have been sitting in your after year at guantanamo because of their citizenship. because we do not trust the yemen government to be responsible. part of the justification for the drone program is that we have the consent of the many government to conduct the operation. they're not trustworthy when it comes to taking detainee's. it seems we're a bit hypocritical in our views of yemen. as i said, i think guantanamo remains a stain on our reputation. recently, congress passed a bill that prohibits granting visas to members of the russian government that refused to human rights the violations. president obama signed it. in retaliation, the russian government passed a bill that prohibits americans from adopting russian children, and president clinton, before signing it at a news conference, was quite angry about the bill that our governmen
into the mental health system? host: it targeted way. but the irs national -- the fbi has national bank of printing database. the real issue is accountability. holding those the purchase a weapon and uncountable, not only for their own use, but by those that may steal them. this is a commentary this weekend. host: so, we are getting your thoughts this morning. what are the other articles this morning in the arts section of "the new york times"? this is the front page. the picture next to this show of the golden globe winners from last night. the issue of extreme violence on screens has become a thicket that programmers cannot avoid. "i do not think that there is anyone on this planet whose life has not been changed or affected by the recent course of events. nothing that is on the air is inappropriate. the network justifies the level of carnage by making sure the bad guys are brought to justice. there's a shot -- "criminal lines" is an adult show -- criminal minds" is an adult show. steve, good morning. caller: in my judgment, the issue of violence and cause and effect relative to child
are people who have been cleared for transfer, that the cia and department justice and the fbi and the burden of defense has looked at and concluded that we're not going to prosecute them, we don't have evidence and we don't believe they present a significant risk and we don't want to keep them. but they have been sitting year after year at guantanamo because of their citizenship. trust the yemeni government to be responsible for the detainee's which i find interesting. the justification for the drone program is that we have the consent of the yemeni government. they are defined government when they give consent to kill people but not trust for the one comes to taking detainee's. it seems we are a bit hypocritical in our view of yemen. i think guantanamo remains a stain on our reputation. recently, congress passed a bill that prohibits granting visas to members of the russian government who abuse human rights violations. president obama signed it. in retaliation, the russian government passed a bill that prohibits americans from adopting russian children and president vladimir putin before s
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)